Editorial

Diversify currency

Countries should place women on currency

In a press conference held on International Women’s Day, Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, announced that an “iconic Canadian woman” will be featured on Canada’s newest banknotes.

The move to print iconic women on the banknotes was pushed forward by an online petition in response to the country’s act to replace the five Canadian women that were initially on their $50 banknote with an image of an iceberg, according to Washington Post.

Canada’s move is one that any country could follow. There are prominent women throughout history that have made a difference for every country.

We The Threefold promote the faces of women on banknotes in any country. We believe that every country has strong women that could be placed on the bills.

The United States’ history, for example, would not be the same without the contributions of women like Susan B. Anthony, Eleanor Roosevelt and Rosa Parks.

The notion that a man should always be on a banknote is not a requirement. It is simply a longstanding pattern that would not impact anything if changed.

Some may argue that since there are fewer women in politics, this point is moot. While this is true, the face that occupies a banknote in the States does not have to be an elected politician, either—the faces of other historical figures like explorer William Clark and inventor Robert Fulton
have also spent time on U.S. currency.

In order to celebrate a holistic view of any country’s history, a country’s government should not hesitate to place any historical figure on a banknote, regardless of sex.

It is for this reason that We The Threefold promote the faces of women on banknotes in any country.