Editorial

Grieve first

Stop politicizing tragedies

More than 300 people were injured and 71 killed in an attack in Pakistan on Easter Sunday.

According to CNN, the “innocent setting” led to more people being attacked.

A witness told CNN, the scene “was so crowded that there was even no way of entering it. We went to a canteen to have something to eat, when there was suddenly a big blast. Everyone panicked, running to all directions. Many of them were blocked at the gate of the park. Dead bodies can be found everywhere.”

Political candidates responded shortly after the attack. Some expressed condolences while others used this as an opportunity to point attention back to themselves.

John Kasich issued a statement that stated, “Let us remember the victims and their families in our thoughts and prayers as we gather strength and resolve to defeat all who threaten our values.”

Sanders also quickly responded on Twitter, “We are grieving today for the families affected by the deplorable attack in Lahore. No one should ever fear taking their children to a park.”

While Sanders and Kasich showed support, Trump responded with a statement that he alone can “solve terrorism.”

We The Threefold Advocate believe that the hours and days immediately following the attack need to focus on the victims, not on politics.

Trump should have expressed condolences, but instead he attempted to put the focus back on himself.

This is often done by political candidates. After attacks or tragedies people feel the need to say why it happened or blame someone for the situation that led to the problem.

We understand that oftentimes tragedies cause us to reevaluate our policies and make people see changes that need to take place. However, this should not be the immediate response. Rather, it should be to take care of the people affected.

Trump could have explained how terrorism was a problem without trying to put himself in the spotlight. Saying that he alone can fix the problem does not show any sympathy for the victims of the attack.

We The Threefold encourage candidates and citizens to first empathize with victims of tragic accidents and later discuss the problems at hand. No one should use a tragedy to put the focus on themselves.